Proud to support another season of youth baseball! Go Angels!

No big deal. Just a custom, made-from-scratch, printable NCAA tournament bracket for TechHoops.com.

Last year, I was proud to support the local arts by purchasing an ad in the playbill for the New River Stage production of “Honk!”

New River Stage is a local community theatre company that puts on performances that welcome actors of all ages.

I am proud to support them again this spring. I encourage all of you to support your local community theatre and your local art scene, be it music, paintings, sketches, or something else.

B.A.M. Because the Arts Matter. Spread the word.

Understanding Like-gate →

joncrowley:

Dalton Caldwell does an excellent job explaining how Facebook’s recent changes, while being negative for brands, are likely user-neutral at worst, and an indication of the final direction of the platform’s business model.

If you are a Facebook page admin, this article is a must read.

(via attentionindustry)

Attention Facebook Page Admins

If you are a Facebook page admin, listen up. Whether you have 50, 500 or 5,000 “likes” on your page, only about 10 percent of your posts are showing up in your followers’ news feeds. If you want to reach a bigger audience, you have to pay to promote that post. The cost depends on how many followers you have.

There is a way around it, but you have to let your followers know and on a regular basis, too. If you have the budget, it might be worth paying a one-time fee to promote a post (like the one below) that lets your followers know how to ensure your posts appear in their news feed.

You may have seen posts floating around, but we’ve created a template that you can use for your page - just customize it to fit your page and post away.

PSA: Only 10 percent of people who who like this page see our posts in their news feed. Facebook requires page administrators to pay to promote their pages to 100% of the people who like a page.

To make sure you SEE ALL OF OUR POSTS in your news feed, please VISIT OUR PAGE, click on the on the gear symbol near the “Like” button.

Click on it and select “ADD TO THE INTEREST LISTS” By doing this, you will keep on seeing our posts on your wall and the page will not be removed. If you’re a page admin, spread the word.

There you have it. Go forth and spread the word!

Email Marketing: Rules of the Unsubscribe

Today I came across a spam email from a company called Laurie Pehar Borsh PR. According to its website, the company offers quite a bit for personal and business public relations including:

  • Page 1 ranking and consistent “top placement” on search engines
  • Email PR/promotional campaigns for business development

These are just a couple of the services the company claims to provide clients. I’m not usually one to criticize other companies, but there are two things about LPR that rubbed me the wrong way and I want to pass along their mistakes to help you avoid 1) making the same mistakes and/or 2) avoid doing business with a company like this.

First, I went to unsubscribe from their emailing list. I clicked on the unsubscribe link and was taken to a page that required my email address AND my first and last name. This is where they went wrong. 

The only thing you can legally require from someone to unsubscribe from your email list is their email. Anything else is in violation of the CAN SPAM Act and subject to a $16,000 fine… per violation… which means per email you send out. Yeah, how many emails are on your list?

The basic do’s and don’ts of email marketing are spelled out on the official CAN SPAM Act website, but here’s the specific language regarding unsubscribing:

You can’t charge a fee, require the recipient to give you any personally identifying information beyond an email address, or make the recipient take any step other than sending a reply email or visiting a single page on an Internet website as a condition for honoring an opt-out request.

So, because I didn’t want to receive any more emails from LPR, I provided information in the required fields and then sent an email the contact email provided in the marketing material.

OK, so my first issue was with their violations of the CAN SPAM Act. The other issue I have is that they claim to offer “page 1 ranking and consistent ‘top placement’ on search engines.” 

I would be wary of any company that guarantees page 1 rankings in “search engines.” For starters, I’m sure they meant search engine results pages (SERPs). Secondly, unless you’re Google, Yahoo, Bing or any other search engines, you can’t guarantee any rankings.

If you’re doing email marketing, make sure you’re following the rules.

Having trouble posting to your Facebook page?

Yesterday (May 24, 2012) I attempted to share a YouTube video on one of the Facebook pages of which I am an administrator. I copied and pasted the YouTube link into the status update field and Facebook automatically converted the link into the usual video display.

I then customized the text in the status update (and removed the original YouTube link), tagged a couple of other pages and then hit the share button.

Nothing.

I clicked “submit” again. Nothing.

I visited the actual page url (facebook.com/pageurl) in another browser tab to make sure that the post hadn’t gone through. Nope. Nothing.

  • I tried everything I could think of:
  • I removed the tagged pages.
  • I tried another browser; with and without extensions/add-ons.
  • I tried PC and Mac.
  • I changed the setting that allows me to post to the page as the page even though I wasn’t using Facebook as the page (did you follow all of that?).

But nothing worked.

Finally, I submitted a help ticket, which as we know will never be answered by a living, breathing human being. But, at least I did something I could pass along to the higher ups when they ask why such and such video wasn’t posted.

As a last resort, I went to the Facebook Community forum where I found others that were having the same issue. I’m not alone and if you’re having the same issue, neither are you.

It was there I found Jen Frazer, a Facebook page admin, who posted a work around she found in another Facebook forum:

To post to your Page, instead of accessing your page by way of the standard URL, i.e. www.facebook.com/pageurl, replace www with beta.

It should look like this: beta.facebook.com/pageurl

Now posting. It worked for me and should do the trick until Facebook fixes this issue. If they fix the issue.

Here’s a link to forum: http://nrv.me/KXBFRZ

So, all we can do at this point is wait and see if Facebook fixes the issue. Of course, with all that’s going on with FB right now, who knows.

We are proud to support local youth sports (and be the coach)! Go Nats!

In case you missed it, Google had another good April Fool’s Day gag with the introduction of Google Tap, which purported to replace the QWERTY keyboard with a simple Morse Code keyboard with only two keys; a dot and a dash.

And if that wasn’t cool enough, it would even let you type two emails at once with a split screen. 

It doesn’t take long to figure out this is a gag, but in case you were strung along, you should have figured it out when they popped up LL Cool J as a Google engineer. Epic win in my book!

attentionindustry:

Human Readable Terms / Policies / Guidelines

Tumblr won a piece of my heart with this, probably the first large-scale social network TOS that is organized in a way that indicates it’s designed to be read.

Broken into three sections (TOS, Privacy Policy, and Community Guidelines) and written with a hint of Tumblr’s community tone and manner (Check out the last two images), this is a step beyond most companies, in terms of making a legal document for human beings.

It’s still a lot of text, and could stand some consolidation or guidance, but for now? I’m calling this as a best in class example.

Bravo.

Agreed. When this popped up on my screen, I was very impressed. Breaking it up into a user-friendly, three-tabbed section really helps.